Abu Dhabi Investment Authority to invest $50 billion in India, says Suresh Prabhu

Abu Dhabi Investment Authority to invest $50 billion in India, says Suresh Prabhu

Union minister for commerce and industry Suresh Prabhu on Friday said that the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority, a sovereign wealth fund owned by Emirate of Abu Dhabi, will invest USD 50 billion in India, especially into infrastructure and food processing capacity, according to a Times of India report.

Speaking at the inaugural function of the annual venture capital summit in Panaji, Prabhu announced that the agreement has been signed on Thursday. Abu Dhabi-based sovereign wealth fund is interested in investing in India in a big way, he added.

According to the agency, Prabhu had also asked the International Finance Corporation to help attract other sovereign funds and pension funds to invest into India.

The Commerce Minister said that India is a top investment destination in the world today. Twenty states have their Startup policy. Suresh Prabhu stated that infrastructure is the sector where India is developing at a faster rate and this is creating lots of opportunities for investors.

He further remarked that India is one country where almost every citizen is an entrepreneur and where 600 million farmers and retailers take enormous risks. The fragmented Indian agricultural holdings provides great opportunity for startups to bridge the productivity gap by providing solutions using cutting edge technology like AI and drones.

Suresh Prabhu also declared Goa as the permanent venue for the Annual Global Venture Capital Summit. The Summit will take place in Goa on the first Friday of December every year.

Edited by Chitranjan Kumar

source =.”businesstoday”

This sell-off was caused by a computer-driven ‘footrace,’ Jim Cramer says

Sell-off caused by computer-driven 'footrace,' says Jim Cramer

Sell-off caused by computer-driven ‘footrace,’ says Jim Cramer   11 Hours Ago | 01:10

As CNBC’s Jim Cramer watched stocks nosedive in Tuesday’s trading session, one thing became abundantly clear to the longtime market-watcher: it “was all about the rise of the machines.”

The major averages all fell more than 2 percent as a possible slowdown signal in the bond market and lingering trade fears rattled investors. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell more than 800 points intraday.

Some attributed the dramatic declines to a lack of buyers, but Cramer already knew the culprits: complex algorithmic programs set up by professional money managers to sell when the odds of future market losses increase.

In other words, when an event that often precedes a recession occurs — in Tuesday’s case, short-term interest rates trading above long-term rates in a so-called yield curve inversion — some trading algorithms will automatically begin selling securities because the chances of an economic slowdown just got higher.

Cramer, host of “Mad Money,” drew a comparison with football. Some plays can seem very risky, but when you consider the percentage chances of them going right, there’s no choice but to implement them in the field. These programs make the same kind of calculation.

So, when the two-year and the five-year yield curves inverted on Tuesday, some hedge funds’ programs automatically sold the S&P 500, which tends to fall in times of economic weakness, and others automatically sold shares of the big banks, which suffer when long-term rates are lower, Cramer said.

“Why? Because historically, this situation has produced negative results for the bank stocks and these hedge funds are trying to get out ahead of others who fear those negative results but just don’t know they’re going to fear them. It’s a footrace,” he explained. “This curve, as they call it, overrides whatever you hear about good employment or consumer balance sheets or robust lending. It’s predictive.”

Worse, the charts are signaling more pain ahead: based on Cramer’s analysis, many hedge funds likely sold the S&P 500 when it dipped below its 200-day moving average because, in the past, that move tended to bring more downside.

“Here’s the problem: there are now so many hedge funds using the same algorithm, same programs [that] there simply aren’t enough investors willing to take the other side of the trade. If we all know that stocks go down on certain triggers, then who the heck would want to buy stocks?” Cramer said.

“That’s how you get a day like today, where the market goes into free-fall,” the “Mad Money” host continued. “When the percentages are against you and the algorithms are in charge, … nobody wants to try to be a hero and bet against them.”

[“source=cnbc”]

RBI’s New Norms On Bad Loans A Wake Up Call For Defaulters, Says Government

Image result for RBI's New Norms On Bad Loans A Wake Up Call For Defaulters, Says Government

Banks will face penalties in case of failure to comply with the guidelines, RBI said.

New Delhi: In a bid to hasten the resolution of bad loans, RBI has tightened rules to make banks identify and tackle any non-payment of loan rapidly, a move the government said should act as a “wake up call” for defaulters. The Reserve Bank of India abolished half a dozen existing loan-restructuring mechanisms late last night, and instead provided for a strict 180-day timeline for banks to agree on a resolution plan in case of a default or else refer the account for bankruptcy.

Financial Services Secretary Rajiv Kumar said the new rules are a “wake up call” for defaulters.

“The government is determined to clean up things in one go and not defer it. It is a more transparent system for resolution,” he said,” he told PTI here.

Under the new rules, insolvency proceedings would have to be initiated in case of a loan of Rs. 2,000 crore or more if a resolution plan is not implemented within 180 days of the default.

Banks will face penalties in case of failure to comply with the guidelines, RBI said.

Financial Services Secretary said the RBI’s decision would not have much impact on provisioning norms for banks.

The revised framework has specified norms for “early identification” of stressed assets, timelines for implementation of resolution plans, and a penalty on banks for failing to adhere to the prescribed timelines.

RBI has also withdrawn the existing mechanism which included Corporate Debt Restructuring Scheme, Strategic Debt Restructuring Scheme (SDR) and Scheme for Sustainable Structuring of Stressed Assets (S4A).

The Joint Lenders’ Forum (JLF) as an institutional mechanism for resolution of stressed accounts also stands discontinued, it said, adding that “all accounts, including such accounts where any of the schemes have been invoked but not yet implemented, shall be governed by the revised framework”.

Under the new rules, banks must report defaults on a weekly basis in the case of borrowers with more than Rs. 5 crore of loan. Once a default occurs, banks will have 180 days within which to come up with a resolution plan. Should they fail, they will need to refer the account to the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code (IBC) within 15 days.

Last year, the government had given more powers to the RBI to push banks to deal with non-performing assets (NPAs) or bad loans.

The gross NPAs of public sector and private sector banks as on September 30, 2017 were Rs.7,33,974 crore, Rs. 1,02,808 crore respectively.

“In view of the enactment of the IBC, it has been decided to substitute the existing guidelines with a harmonised and simplified generic framework for resolution of stressed assets,” RBI said in the notification.

As per the revised guidelines, the banks will be required to identify incipient stress in loan accounts, immediately on default, by classifying stressed assets as special mention accounts (SMAs) depending upon the period of default.

Classification of SMA would depend on the number of days (1- 90) for which principal or interest have remained overdue.

“As soon as there is a default in the borrower entity’s account with any lender, all lenders – singly or jointly – shall initiate steps to cure the default,” RBI said.

The resolution plan (RP) may involve any actions/plans/ reorganisation including, but not limited to, regularisation of the account by payment of all over dues by the borrower entity, sale of the exposures to other entities/investors, change in ownership, or restructuring.

The notification said that if a resolution plan in respect of large accounts is not implemented as per the timelines specified, lenders will be required to file insolvency application, singly or jointly, under the IBC, 2016, within 15 days from the expiry of the specified timeline.

All lenders are required to submit report to Central Repository of Information on Large Credits (CRILC) on a monthly basis effective April 1, 2018.

In addition, the lenders shall report to CRILC, all borrower entities in default (with aggregate exposure of Rs. 5 crore and above), on a weekly basis, at the close of business every Friday, or the preceding working day if Friday happens to be a holiday.

The first such weekly report shall be submitted for the week ending February 23, 2018, the notification said.

The new guidelines have specified framework for early identification and reporting of stressed assets.

In respect of accounts with aggregate exposure of the lenders at Rs. 2,000 crore and above, on or after March 1, 2018 (reference date), resolution plan RP should be implemented within 180 days.

“If in default after the reference date, then 180 days from the date of first such default,” the notification said.

[“Source-ndtv”]

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says the economy’s success depends on infrastructure

Wilbur Ross, U.S. commerce secretary

Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images
Wilbur Ross, U.S. commerce secretary

The strong U.S. economy’s continued success depends largely on infrastructure, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Tuesday.

“Corporate earnings certainly have been very, very strong. there’s no question about that. And it’s also no question that market’s job is to look ahead,” Ross said. “I think a lot will have to do with whether infrastructure gets the kind of treatment that it really deserves.”

Ross, speaking at the Yahoo Finance All Markets Summit in Washington, was asked whether the prospect of diminished corporate earnings in the near future will be a drag on the economy. He added that the only real obstacle to passing an infrastructure bill is its funding.

“As you know, [the] president is very keen to have an infrastructure program, and the only real issue is how do you pay for it. How much does the federal government do, how much is done by [the] private sector,” Ross said.

The concept of an executive-level infrastructure push has itself become a bit of a laughing matter to critics. In February, President Donald Trump proposed spending $200 billion in a bid to coax $1.5 trillion in infrastructure investing mainly from state and local governments, as well as private entities, but the plan went nowhere.

The administration’s “Infrastructure Week” theme also became the butt of jokes.

[“source=forbes]

‘Multiple and intertwined risks’ cloud outlook for the Middle East and its neighbors, IMF says

Dubai, U.A.E.

Major oil producing countries in the Middle East and its neighbors might benefit from higher crude prices in 2019, according to the latest outlook from International Monetary Fund (IMF), but there are numerous uncertainties in the region.

The Fund’s latest regional economic outlook for the Middle East, North Africa, Afghanistan, and Pakistan (MENAP) region, published Tuesday, warns that “multiple and intertwined risks cloud the outlook of the MENAP region.”

“These include a faster-than-anticipated tightening of global financial conditions, escalating trade tensions that could affect global growth and hurt key MENAP trading partners, geopolitical strains, and spillovers from regional conflicts,” the report stated.

These risks could trigger a deterioration in financial market sentiment and greater financial market volatility, the Fund said, “aggravating the financing challenges for countries with high levels of debt or large refinancing needs.”

Oil producing countries in the Middle East have traditionally relied on oil exports as their source of government revenue. Volatility in oil markets amid imbalances in supply and demand have prompted a number of countries, particularly in the Gulf, to look to diversify their economies away from oil and to create more jobs in other sectors of the economy. In its latest summary on the MENAP region’s outlook, it encouraged countries to commit to further reforms.

“The outlook and the rising risks underscore the need to intensify efforts to raise growth to levels that generate enough jobs for the benefit of all,” the IMF said. “In this context, countries should expand access to finance, strengthen governance, improve education outcomes, and enhance labor market flexibility, particularly in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC).”

To ensure that future fiscal adjustment is as growth-friendly and equitable as possible, the Fund said countries need to both prioritize expenditure on “growth-enhancing and high-quality investment in human capital and physical infrastructure, while sustaining well-targeted social spending.” It also advocated a move to a more progressive tax structure to diversify the governments’ revenue bases.

Jihad Azour, director of the Middle East and Central Asia at the IMF, told CNBC on Tuesday that the MENAP report comes amid an uncertain global growth outlook.

“Global conditions are changing in terms of the risk metrics,” Azour told CNBC’s Dan Murphy. “Although we’re still enjoying a high level of growth, that growth is plateauing,” he added.

Oil prices

Despite the warnings from the IMF, growth prospects for both oil exporters and oil importers in the MENAP region appear resilient, albeit dented slightly by the recent re-imposition of U.S. sanctions on major oil producer Iran.

“Overall, despite a significantly weaker outlook for Iran given the re-imposition of sanctions, oil-exporting countries are projected to grow at 1.4 percent in 2018 and 2 percent in 2019,” the Fund said.

Meanwhile, among GCC countries — namely, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain, and Oman — growth is expected to recover to 2.4 percent in 2018 and 3 percent in 2019. “This is underpinned by a recovery in non-oil activity, supported by a slower pace of fiscal consolidation, and stronger oil production,” the Fund said.

Problematically, if oil prices continued to increase, as predicted by the Fund, that could weaken the resolve of oil exporters to continue reforms, while exacerbating pressures on oil importers.

That said, oil-importing countries in the MENAP region (which include Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Pakistan, Syria and Tunisia, among others) are expected to continue at a modest pace of 4.5 percent in 2018, before dropping back to 4 percent in 2019.

“However, growth is uneven, with about three-quarters of oil-importing countries expected to grow at less than 5 percent over the medium term, too low to address the region’s employment challenges and developmental needs,” the IMF said. “Higher oil prices are also offsetting some of the underlying improvements in external and fiscal balances.”

[“source=forbes]